sports medicine journal articles

Energy Demands and Metabolic Equivalents (METS) in U-19 Basketball Refereeing During Official Games

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The metabolic demands among U-19 basketball players were studied; however, physical and physiological demands of U-19 basketball refereeing during competition are rather scant. The aim of this study was to analyze the energy expenditure (EE) and the exercise intensity of basketball refereeing during official game and determined as Metabolic Equivalent (METs). Sixteen elite level basketball referees were studied during U-19 basketball games (n=8) for time motion analyses (TMA).

sports medicine journal articlesThe EE data were calculated, using specific equations, from the time spent by the referee in each exercise-intensity zone. During game, referees spent a mean EE of 504.4 ± 77.7 kcal. A significant difference was observed between 113.5 ± 18.2 kcal in the 1st quarter (Q1) and 137 ± 27.5 kcal in the Q4 (p=0.007). The averaged EE (~5 kcal.kg-1.h-1) corresponded to “moderate energy intensity” (~5 METs) with a large contribution of the aerobic energy pathway.

The Levels of C-Reactive Protein, Malondialdehyde and Absolute Lymphocyte Counts in Pre and Post-Acute Exercise

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sports medicine journal articlesPhysical exercise is important for maintaining physical fitness and can contribute positively to maintaining a healthy weight, muscle strength, promoting physiological well-being and strengthening the immune system. Developing research has demonstrated that many of the benefits of exercise are mediated through the release of myokines which promote the growth of new tissue and reduces the risk of developing inflammatory diseases. According to the World Health Organization, lack of physical activity contributes to approximately 17% of heart disease and diabetes, 12% of falls in the elderly and 10% of breast cancer and colon cancer.

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The Levels of C-Reactive Protein, Malondialdehyde and Absolute Lymphocyte Counts in Pre and Post-Acute Exercise

Posted on

sports medicine journal articlesPhysical exercise is important for maintaining physical fitness and can contribute positively to maintaining a healthy weight, muscle strength, promoting physiological well-being and strengthening the immune system. Developing research has demonstrated that many of the benefits of exercise are mediated through the release of myokines which promote the growth of new tissue and reduces the risk of developing inflammatory diseases. According to the World Health Organization, lack of physical activity contributes to approximately 17% of heart disease and diabetes, 12% of falls in the elderly and 10% of breast cancer and colon cancer.

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The Risk of Non-Traumatic Myelopathy in Time Trial (TT) or Downhill (DH) Bike Position

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sports medicine journal impact factorThe time trial (TT) or downhill (DH) position (Figure 1) in cycling, which is different from general riding form, is used in time trial road races or triathlons to decrease air resistance and achieve faster speeds. In the TT or DH position, the rider’s neck is extended and his or her body is strained while racing, and some athletes develop neck pain or headache. Most cases of neck pain may be caused by fatigue due to sustained muscular stress, but there may be some risk of myelopathy in some cases.

Triathlons involve different distances, and there are also many different styles of bicycle; likewise, different athletes have different racing experiences and different body conditions. However, the TT position or DH position is common and many cyclists can use DH bars for faster speed.

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Left Ventricular Function Improve after Bench Press: A Speckle Tracking and 3D Echocardiography Study

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sports medicine journal impact factorSpeckle tracking echo cardiography is introducing new hypotheses about the patho physiology of cardiovascular elite athlete. The Speckle Tracking allows us to evaluate the strain (S), the strain rate (SR), tissue velocities and displacement; being it less influenced by the angle of study, or by the load nor sex, nor they age or systolic blood pressure values. Ventricular remodeling that athlete produce is very variable, depending on the type of sport, age, gender, time or type of training, race or genetics. We consider that there are two types of remodeled, concentric and eccentric.

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Associations between Physical Activity and Submaximal Cardiorespiratory and Pulmonary Responses in Men

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Habitual physical activity (PA) is associated with higher cardio respiratory fitness values, but additional information is needed on the contributions of specific types and amounts of PA. Therefore the main aim of this study was to analyze the heart and lung function of a large cohort of men and compare these outcomes with various modes and volumes of PA. We used data from 30,594 men from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study who were categorized into sedentary, swimmer, walker, and runner groups using self-report PA data collected during 1970-2005.

sports medicine journal articles

Additional PA categories using MET-minutes/week were used to group men into 5 distinct levels of activity (0 MET-min, 1-499 MET-min, 500-999 MET-min, 1000-1499 MET-min, and ? 1500 MET-min). Each participant also completed a maximal treadmill exercise test to quantify their fitness level. Cross-sectional analyses included general linear modeling and multiple comparisons adjusted for age, smoking status, and histories of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and hypertension. Results: A dose-response linear effect was found for heart function variables across PA MET-min categories.

A Novel Field Test to Determine Critical Speed

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sports medicine journal articles

The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of a novel field test of critical running speed (CS). Ten trained male distance runners completed a familiarisation trial plus three separate experimental trials on a standard 400 m athletics track. Each trial consisted of three distances (1200, 2400 and 3600 metres) that were selected to produce finishing times in the region of 3, 7 and 12 minutes respectively. Participants were instructed to cover the set distance in the fastest time possible. Participants rested for 30 minutes between efforts. Data were modelled using the linear distance-time model, described by the equation: d = (CS x t) + ARC, where: d = distance run (m), t = running time (s), and ARC = anaerobic running capacity (m).

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